Let Tanner Foust share some proper donut-making technique on National Donut Day

Tanner Foust knows how to cook up a proper donut – at least of the automotive kind. The Volkswagen R brand ambassador has twice won championships for drifting, where cars go in precise circles while turning tires into smoke, and demonstrated his handling skills at the wheel of the Volkswagen 560-hp rallycross Volkswagen Beetles. (You may have also seen his skills in a few movies along the way.) For this year’s National Donut Day, Tanner took some time to demonstrate some of his donut-making tricks, both in the kitchen and on the race circuit. He’s definitely more skilled at one over the other. Find out which here:  

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Drive-in theaters experience a revival nationwide amid COVID

Drive-in movie theaters are one of the few businesses experiencing a renaissance amid the coronavirus pandemic. As one of the few entertainment destinations you can still visit outside of the home, they’ve experienced a boom in popularity and demand over the past couple months. “We’ve seen a resurgence in interest across the country. Our shows are selling out every night. It’s the best market I have ever seen in all my years in business,” says Jim Kopp, owner of The Family Drive-in Theatre in Stephens City, Va. The open-air venues are uniquely suited to thrive while many brick-and-mortar theaters have temporarily closed. Though there aren’t many left in the U.S. — about 330 still exist, compared to over 5,400 multiplexes — they’ve been bright spots of entertainment, comfort and nostalgia at this difficult time. “We’ve heard from a lot of folks that they didn’t even realize drive-in theaters still existed [before the pandemic],” Kopp said. The Family Drive-in Theatre, which has been a staple in the community since 1956, has reopened with an abundance of caution to help protect their patrons. Moviegoers must buy tickets and concessions online, don face masks outside and maintain a proper social distance from fellow guests and their cars. Theater management has also limited the two-screen drive-in to half capacity, closed the children’s outdoor playground and covered their movie speakers in protective wrap. Bathrooms are sanitized by attendants after every use. “Folks want to come, have fun and feel safe in their automobiles all while maintaining proper social distancing,” says Kopp. “Our lifestyle has been so disrupted [by the pandemic] and our theaters provide a chance for people to return to normalcy.”   In honor of National Drive-In Movie Day, we asked Kopp for ten tips on how to make your next (or first) drive-in movie experience a success: Secure tickets in advance: Most drive-in ticket sales have moved online, so be sure to scope out the best showtimes online and purchase your ticket ahead of the show. “It’s automatic insurance that you’re going to get in,” says Kopp. Arrive early: Demand is high, especially during the summer, so Kopp suggests moviegoers arrive at least an hour early to secure a spot near the front of the screen. If you’re looking to beat the crowds and avoid parking hassles, you may want to consider a weekday screening. Pack toys and games: After arriving early, you’ll have some time to kill before the film starts. Be sure to pack some light entertainment, such as a book or card game, for you and the kids. Dress comfortably: Consider wearing cozy clothes, such as shorts and leggings, and extra layers to stay warm and relaxed. Kids can always wear their pajamas to the show, which makes it convenient for parents when putting them to bed after a late screening. Bring bug repellent and sunscreen: Most drive-in movie theaters are in or around wooded areas, which means bugs. Unless you enjoy swatting them all night, pack some spray. Sunscreen is another good option for protection from those hot summer rays. Pack a portable radio and extra batteries: While The Family Drive-In has speakers located throughout the pavilion, the noise of fellow guests can carry over and Kopp suggests packing a small AM/FM radio to make sure you capture every bit of dialog. Bring pillows and blankets: One of the biggest perks of drive-ins is sitting outside underneath the stars. To make the experience cozier, put down the back rows of your parked Atlas or Tiguan and open the trunk towards the screen. Order from the concession stand: Drive-ins typically make most of their money from concession stands. Kopp doesn’t accept a salary and puts all the theater profits back into his business. To adjust to current safety measures and to continue keeping revenue fluid, he has moved the theater’s concession operations online. Patrons can now order boxed goods via an app. An exception to the rule is to purchase a food permit, which typically ranges from $5-$10. It allows you to bring in food from outside while helping the drive-in owners offset the loss of revenue from the concession stand. Put away your cellphone: Refrain from any cell phone use during the show. It can be disturbing to guests and distracts from the experience. Prepare to have a good time: “Sit down, relax and enjoy the show,” Kopp says.

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#TBT: Learn about the past, present, and future of mobility with virtual Autostadt tours

With public attractions like museums and theme parks largely closed around the world, many are turning to virtual tours. Autostadt, the automotive theme park next to the Volkswagen production factory in Wolfsburg, Germany, has recently reopened, but developed several virtual experiences. A coloring project lets people virtually race through the park in a personalized ID. BUZZ concept vehicle, and a series of “sofa tours” allow a closer look at the past, present, and future of mobility. Bring the ID. BUZZ to life by downloading and printing the official Autostadt ID. BUZZ coloring sheet as well as downloading the Quiver app from the app store onto a mobile device. Once the coloring sheet is filled in, scan the entire page on the app and a personalized ID. BUZZ will appear on the virtual Autostadt racing course. On the app, the ID. BUZZ can race through a timed course around the automotive park, giving users a glimpse of its iconic landmarks like the Volkswagen factory, Customer Center silos and the piazza entrance where every visit at the park begins. The virtual race is a fun introduction to Autostadt, the Volkswagen Group’s automotive theme park, which opened in 2000, and includes the world’s largest delivery center, delivering an average of 500 Volkswagen and SEAT vehicles daily. Besides racing the ID. BUZZ, the park offers virtual “sofa tours” on the official Instagram account. These tours highlight its biggest attractions and popular vehicles as well as the park’s modern architecture and impressive grounds. The virtual tours give users a look at historical attractions like ZeitHaus, the multi-brand car museum. The museum’s collection has more than 250 vehicles from over 60 different brands including the Benz Patent-Motorwagen Number 1, Ford Model T, Bugatti Atlantic and Volkswagen Beetle. Many of the vehicles showcased are important contributions that helped to shape the automotive industry. Many of the vintage cars at the museum are still in use, taking part in rallies and road trips throughout the year. As a result, the exhibits constantly change, giving guests a different experience every visit. To learn more about the current Volkswagen Group offerings, the virtual tours feature the Volkswagen brand pavilion. It is one of eight brand pavilions that give visitors the opportunity to see the latest models as well as learn about the values and philosophy of each brand – Volkswagen, Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles, Audi, SEAT, Škoda, Lamborghini and Porsche. The eighth pavilion features the Group’s high-end segment with a mirrored Bugatti Veyron as its centerpiece. Besides the past and present, the virtual tours give users the opportunity to experience the future of mobility in the park’s new exhibition, “Get Ready for ID.” The exhibit is entirely dedicated to the company’s future e-mobility products like the ID. BUZZ and alludes to a brighter, more electric future.

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How the Volkswagen Group’s worldwide logistics teams help fight COVID-19

As one of the world’s largest automakers, the Volkswagen Group has a special expertise in getting essential parts to the right place at the right time. Over the past three months, that expertise in shipping and logistics has taken on a new mission: Finding, transporting and in some cases setting up production for personal protective equipment needed to fight the COVID-19 outbreak worldwide. In the United States, Volkswagen worked with a consortium of other manufacturers and suppliers, including Dow and Whirlpool, to help launch much-needed production of respirator hoods. In Mexico, Volkswagen worked with fabrics and seating supplier Faurecia to launch production of face masks and gowns for front-line medical workers. And in Germany, Volkswagen experts found a way in a matter of days to ship an estimated $40 million worth of vital protective equipment and supplies – including respiratory masks and disinfectants – from China to help ease equipment shortages in Europe. “Working globally at speed is one of the key strengths that makes the Volkswagen Group a successful automaker,” said Michael Lovati, senior vice president of purchasing and chief procurement officer for the North American Region at Volkswagen Group of America. “We know how to get suppliers and buyers together to get products where they need to be, and we’ve been thankful for the opportunity to help our communities worldwide fight this disease.” At Volkswagen Chattanooga, a team of supply and logistics experts have been working for the past few months to broker connections with materials and supply-chain partners to find critical components and fabric. One of the first projects: helping seat supplier Faurecia set up a production line for personal protective equipment at its factory in Puebla, Mexico. With Volkswagen’s help, plus an initial order of 70,000 masks and 5,000 gowns, Faurecia was able to pivot its processes, and can now produce upwards of 1,000,000 masks and 50,000 gowns per week. The Volkswagen task force also assisted Dow and Whirlpool to help produce a powered, air-purifying respirator, or PAPR. With regular N95 protective masks being used rapidly, the PAPR replaces those masks and visors, using a replaceable polyethylene hood that’s flexible, comfortable, and can quickly be replaced between patients. Volkswagen, Dow and parts supplier Magna have also teamed up to launch production of medical gowns. When the outbreak emerged in Germany in March, Volkswagen had already been shipping personal protective equipment to China to support workers facing the outbreak there. Volkswagen arranged for a donation of masks and medical clothing to German hospitals and medical centers – but needed to move them from China first. Due to the critical nature of the request and the growing amount of COVID-19 cases, the Volkswagen teams in China and Germany knew they needed to act quickly. “Normally such a transport takes at least a week. This time we had to make it in half that time,” said Anna Levina, a Volkswagen logistics expert in Germany. “We knew that it would be a very tight race.” Working alongside Volkswagen Group China, Levina’s team was able to overcome multiple obstacles to make this vision a reality, including obtaining all the necessary transportation paperwork and securing a shipping agent in a matter of 72 hours. “We handled the transport with good teamwork. If anyone hadn’t pulled along, we would have failed,” explains Jian Zhou, Head of Logistics at Volkswagen Group China. “It was like a race with different starting points. We had to coordinate with each other constantly along the way.” With the entire world scrambling for the same tools, supplier relations and buyers who can negotiate with them have become essential. Volkswagen buyer Jens-Michael Potthast has been working with colleagues in Beijing to source PPE for global markets. “It’s an absolute sellers’ market. You have to be resourceful and incredibly fast,” says Potthast. “Without good contacts on site, we would achieve little. That’s why it’s extremely important that the procurers in Germany and China have a short line of communication to one another.” < In addition, the Volkswagen Group has started to produce face shield holders by 3D printing at its plants across Europe. This is part of a joint transnational initiative with Airbus and the 3D printing network of about 250 companies known as Mobility Goes Additive and was launched after requests from authorities in Spain for medical protective gear. Production is in progress not only at the large 3D printing centers in Wolfsburg and Ingolstadt, but also at other plants of Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, MAN Truck & Bus, Porsche, Volkswagen Passenger Cars, Volkswagen Group Components and Volkswagen Motorsport. The Group currently uses more than 50 3D printers at its plants, and Volkswagen has added additional printers for this project. In America, the Volkswagen e-Labs at schools in the Chattanooga area pressed their 3D printers into service for face shield production. 3D-printed headbands were delivered to the Public Education Foundation in Chattanooga, which then added the plastic face shields and distributed the final product to local medical centers. 3D printing has shown its usefulness in other ways as well. In collaboration with the Technical University in Prague, ŠKODA has developed a 3D printing process to produce reusable FFP3 respirators. The Czech Ministry of Health is now distributing these to doctors, hospitals, and nursing staff. And in Italy, Lamborghini converted space in its sports car production plant in Sant’Agata Bolognese to produce surgical masks and protective plexiglass shields for Italian front-line workers. “It’s one thing to organize parts for cars. It’s what we do. We knew that this time it was a matter of human lives,” says Levina. “It’s about keeping doctors healthy. Everybody’s put their backs into it.”

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On National Road Trip Day, where do you want to go next?

Due to COVID-19, Americans have stayed off the road, but it doesn’t mean the desire to see the world has faded. It’s not too early to dream about where your first road trip might be and Volkswagen wants to hear about your dream trips today on National Road Trip Day. Volkswagen enthusiasts across the country are invited to join the conversation on social media by sharing the destinations and people they’ll visit once we can all hit the open road again. When the green light is given by your local authorities, and you’re ready and able to drive, we hope you’ll find road trip inspiration in our list of iconic U.S. locales that our staff are daydreaming about visiting (or revisiting). Share your dream travel list or trip ideas with us on social media, tagging @VW on Instagram. West Coast – The Pacific Coast Highway: Nicknamed the All-American Road, the Pacific Coast Highway is one of the most famous and breathtakingly scenic routes in the entire country. Making cameos in several movies, it traverses 521 miles of beaches, mountains and even the city of Los Angeles. It’s a guaranteed cure for cabin fever and a breath of fresh air in one trip. East Coast – The Blue Ridge Parkway: As a National Parkway, this option is also known as the country’s longest linear park. It runs from Virginia all the way to Cherokee, North Carolina, clocking in at 469 miles. A fun fact is that the speed limit is never higher than 45 mph, making this option a leisurely cruise that allows you to really enjoy the surrounding nature. Cross Country – Route 66: Known to every American, it’s no surprise that Route 66 is called “The Main Street of America” but did you know it is the most Instagrammed road trip with 1,708,620 hashtags as of early 2020? Route 66 crosses 8 states and 3 time zones, covering 2,448 miles. We suggest starting in Chicago. New England – Connecticut River Blueway: The New England region is known for its oceanic coastline, its craggy mountains and brilliant autumn foliage, but the 410-mile-long Connecticut River Blueway is a hidden gem. As the country’s first and only Blueway, it touches four of the six New England states and has canoe/kayak routes as well as greenways for hiking and bicycling. New York – Hudson Valley: This 7,000+ mile region is named after the fact it stretches along the Hudson River from Westchester County to Albany, the New York state capital. It’s home to many farms, orchards and charming rural stops, which is something you don’t normally associate with New York. The Storm King Art Center is an open-air museum with contemporary outdoor sculptures that we’re itching to go back to. National Park Pick – Joshua Tree: Immortalized in pop culture, this park shares its name with the widely recognizable Joshua tree species. Visit and you’ll see why the park holds such a strong place in pop culture – the sheer expanse of the park, the colossal boulders and the prismatic sunsets will leave a lasting impression. State Park Pick – Valley of Fire: Nevada’s oldest state park is one of the most Instagrammed places with 219,333 hashtags as of early 2020. Located in the Mojave Desert, the park’s dry and sunny climate is ideal for picnicking, camping, and hiking activities. You won’t be Vitamin D deficient after this trip.  

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#TBT: Ten movies co-starring Volkswagen classics

While many movie theaters remain closed, even as some states start to re-open this month, you can still get your film fix from home. Whether you want to watch something new or revisit an old favorite, these ten movies featuring Volkswagen models are perfect for any mood. The films are available for rent on most streaming services, so make some popcorn, dim the lights and see if you can spot these beloved cars. ‘The Love Bug’ (1968): A down-on-his-luck racecar driver and his mechanic discover a white 1963 Volkswagen Beetle with a mind of its own. ‘Footloose’ (1984, 2011): When a teenager gets pulled over for listening to rock-n-roll in his yellow 1972 Volkswagen Beetle, he realizes his small town is overdue for some change. ‘Pretty in Pink’ (1986): A high school misfit drives her light pink 1959 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia to the prom – a perfect accessory to her homemade, puffy-sleeved dress. ‘Happy Gilmore’ (1996): The transformation of a hockey hack into a pro golfer takes many hilarious turns, including an attack with a white 1972 Volkswagen Super Beetle. ‘50 First Dates’ (2004): An art teacher suffering from short-term memory loss drives a sunny yellow 1973 Volkswagen Thing as she goes on dates around Hawaii. ‘Little Miss Sunshine’ (2006): A dysfunctional family comes together as they road-trip to California in a yellow 1971 Volkswagen T2 Microbus. ‘Horrible Bosses’ (2011): Three disgruntled employees plot revenge against their oppressive bosses from a silver 2011 Volkswagen Jetta. ‘Bumblebee’ (2018): When a teenager discovers a beat-up yellow 1967 Volkswagen Beetle in a junkyard, she unwittingly brings an extraterrestrial civil war to Earth. ‘Once Upon A Time in Hollywood’ (2019): An actor’s stunt double drives a baby blue 1964 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia as he struggles to find meaningful work in the final years of Hollywood’s Golden Age. ‘Between Two Ferns: The Movie’ (2019): In his quest to earn a show on network TV, a comedian drives his 2006 Volkswagen Passat wagon across the country, interviewing celebrities along the way.

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How the latest 4Motion® with Active Control all-wheel drive system helps keep the Atlas on track

Last year, nearly 8 million vehicles sold in America came with some form of all-wheel-drive. In northern states, all-wheel or four-wheel drive has long been considered essential for winter travel. Even in southern states, all-wheel drive has gained in popularity as a peace-of-mind feature for wild weather days. But as anyone who’s driven on snowy or muddy roads knows, there’s more to getting going than simply which wheel does the work.1 This is why the available 4Motion® with Active Control system on the 2021 Volkswagen Atlas and 2020 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport uses sensors and smart software to direct traction to where it’s needed most. Volkswagen first introduced an all-wheel-drive system for America on the 1986 Quantum Syncro wagon, followed closely by the Syncro model of the Vanagon. Since then, Volkswagen has offered some form of all-wheel drive in several models across its lineup, from the Golf Alltrack and Golf R to the Arteon and Tiguan. All-wheel drive does not mean all wheels drive all the time. That’s actually a good way to burn fuel unnecessarily; instead, the 4Motion system uses an advanced electronic clutch on the rear axle that lets the rear wheels rotate while the front wheels power the Atlas and Atlas Cross Sport in everyday driving. The 4Motion with Active Control system on the 2021 Volkswagen Atlas and 2020 Volkswagen Atlas Cross Sport uses sensors and smart software to direct traction to where it’s most needed. Even when it’s not engaged, the 4Motion system measures the wheel speed multiple times a second, looking for signs of wheel slip. The 4Motion software has been designed to engage before the vehicle’s front wheels lose traction. The electronically controlled clutch can engage in a fraction of a second, sending up to 50 percent of the engine’s power to the rear axle as needed. If an individual wheel begins to slip, the Electronic Stability Control can slow it down, sending more power to the wheel on the opposite side with traction. The Active Control system gives drivers a tool to set how the Atlas and Atlas Cross Sport interact with different types of surfaces, varying engine power, transmission shifts and other parameters. Beyond the “Onroad” mode for everyday driving, Active Control also offers Snow, Offroad and Offroad Custom modes. In “Snow” mode, Active Control employs a more aggressive approach to stopping wheelspin, by employing transmission shifts earlier to help optimize traction, and reducing engine power when the Traction Control System detects slippage. The system is designed to be most sensitive when cornering, and traction is of paramount importance. In “Offroad,” Active Control manages the throttle and transmission similar to “Snow” mode but adds manual transmission control with Tiptronic® and relaxes the wheelspin settings and customizes the ABS system to provide better traction and stopping distances on loose dirt.2 Hill Descent Control is automatically activated on gradients more than 10 percent. For the first time, the 4Motion with Active Control is available with either four-cylinder or V6 for the 2021 Atlas, as it is with the 2020 Atlas Cross Sport. Either way, the technology has decades of experience in keeping you on track.  

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